About

Tinder Project

Fake News Project

Tinder Project

Year

2017

Share

How do you feel when you find your Tinder profile in somewhere that you didn't expect? Is this exhibit a violation of privacy or just an artwork we can understand?

For the project “City of Singles – Portraits of Tinder” I draw over 50 profile images from tinder, the most used dating app worldwide, in order to investigate the almost desperate wish of young humans for meaningful connection in a consuming environment of social interaction. In my view the dating app crystallizes the contradictions between the desire for lasting and meaningful human connection and the increasing share of non-connective interactions between human beings.How do we portray ourselves in order to not get swiped away by in competitive environments? Portrait art is an anachronism in the digital age: it is the observer who has to move, not the object, it cannot be “swiped away”, the portrait is unique; it is the ideal type of an analogue object. Bringing back images of human beings from the digital to painted portraits triggers these very contradicting emotions on imperfection and self-assertion and helps to understand us in a more profound way. I aim at displaying 100 acryl paintings (50cmx50cm) with acrylic on canvas. Individuals on the painting have a different name and age as in real life. The 100 paintings relate to anonymity, that we are confronted with in the virtual world. Portraits of Tinder also plays with the still eminent feeling of discomfort, when a user reveals that app used, although access to tinder profiles cannot be restricted. This also relates to the conflict between personal rights or copyright and artistic freedom that I address with ‘Portraits of Tinder’. Is it socially acceptable to publicly display Tinder portrays although the users do not know of the exhibition? I also want to actively invite Tinder users to the exhibition to discuss this question. Overall, ‘Portraits of Tinder’ artistically addresses different questions and associations on the way we present ourselves, human interaction or freedom of art, which in my view makes this art project so fascinating.

Andreas, 23

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Martin, which is his real name, was discovered by friends and linked on facebook. He was very excited about the information, and left a message on the event page.

“I think, I should go there because I'm in it.”

Georg, 28

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

A friend of him recognized him in an online magazine. A day after the article went online, “Georg” sent me an e-mail.

Kim, 20

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

A visitor recognized her and said, "Oops, I dated her."

Auriane, 24

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Hi Ji-yeon! I went to the exhibition two days ago and saw myself in one of the pictures, which I got really surprised and flattered about! Need to say that I really liked the whole exhibition and it's purpose. I also wonder what's gonna happen with the pictures next, is it possible to buy them?

Best regards

Rebecca

Facebook Message( 01.03 2017)

Gabby, 30

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Anabel, 22

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Benjamin, 34

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Matthias, 32

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Martin, 24

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Justin, 22

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Daniel, 30

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Jenny, 29

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Eva, 27

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Frank, 34

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Fabio, 22

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Sergej, 28

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Michaela, 31

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Ronny, 31

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Chris, 23

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Elizabeth, 25

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Sean, 28

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Robert, 25

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Sarah, 25

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Hanna, 35

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Julia, 30

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Jun, 37

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Flo, 25

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas

Louisa, 33

50 x 50 cm
acrylic on canvas